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February 2013
London Beauty Hub

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A HARLEY STREET COSMETIC SURGEON

cosmetic surgeon harley street london

Have you ever wondered what life is like inside a Harley Street cosmetic clinic?

From high-flying City workers to women whose obsession with their appearance has gone one step too far, Dr Raina Zarb Adami holds unique consultations every day at her Harley Street clinic and carries out a range of non-invasive treatments including botox, dermal fillers, laser hair removal, chemical peels and mole removal.

As well as running Aesthetic Virtue, Raina is studying online for an MBA and working with a charity to develop a synthetic skin to help treat people with serious scarring as part of her PHD thesis.

How does she fit all of this in? London Beauty Hub caught up with Raina to find out what a day in her life is like.

Read More (www.londonbeautyhub.co.uk)

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December 2012
Daily Mail

BOTOX FOR YOUR EYELASHES?
EXTREME BEAUTY TREATMENT PROMISES THICKER, FULLER LASHES…
BUT WATCH OUT FOR THE SIDE EFFECTS

When Botox became available as a beauty treatment six years ago it was hailed by many as nothing short of a miracle.
A-listers such as Simon Cowell, Nicole Kidman and Sharon Osbourne have admitted to trying the popular treatment that promises to turn back time in just one session.

And now the people behind the face-freezing phenomenon are focusing on developing a product to boost our eyelashes.
Healthcare company Allergan have developed a product called Latisse, which is described as 'a prescription treatment for hypotrichosis (inadequate or not enough lashes) to grow eyelashes longer, fuller, darker.'

It was first discovered when it's main ingredient bimatropost, which was used to treat glucoma (where high pressure in the eye damages nerves), notably increased growth and thickness of eyelashes as a side-effect.

Now, the new product which contains bimatropost, has already been used by over 4million women in American, India and Canada and is currently being tested out by Britain's Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency approval process, reports Sunday Times Style magazine.

Loss of lashes is often common in older women and that is where Latisse works well because it slows down eyelash loss.

It is also great for people who, like The Only Way is Essex star Sam Faiers, suffer Trichotillomania - a disorder which causes people to pull out their real eyelashes.

And it appears to work. Research has proven that it doubles eyelash thickness and makes lashes 18 per cent darker and 25 per cent longer in just eight weeks after being swept onto the lashes once daily like an eyeliner.

The way it works is with an active ingredient called bimatoprost, which is one of the first chemicals to show promised hair growth.

'Latisse is 0.93% bimatoprost, an eye drop liquid that is used to treat hypotrichosis which is a reduced growth of hair in a specific area.

'It is used topically on the affected area and over about 16 weeks, boosts hair growth.

'Bimatoprost is usually used for glaucoma treatment in higher concentrations. However, it may have unpleasant side effects. Hence it's use is strictly by prescription,' said Raina Zarb Adami, one of Allergan's county ambassadors.

On the company's website, side effects are cited as: 'Increased brown pigmentation of the colored part of the eye which is likely permanent.'

It also states: 'Eyelid skin darkening may occur and may be reversible. Hair may grow on skin that Latisse frequently touches. Common side effects are itchy and red eyes.'

Another downside is the price and at £80-£100 for a month's supply, it doesn't come cheap. Also, if discontinued, lashes gradually return to their previous appearance.

Alex Karidis, Cosmetic Surgeon to the stars, said: 'This product is very effective and I do think it will be big in the UK because which women don't want fuller eyelashes?

'Most women use false eyelashes and appreciate longer lashes so I think it will appeal brilliantly.

'There have been some known side effects but these can be minimised by applying it accurately.

'It even works on eyebrows.' Cara Delevingne watch out.

Read More (Mail Online)

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October 2012
Body Language Magazine

FACIAL CONTOURING

Restoration of facial contouring and enhancement are the primary goals of patients desiring to roll back the year. Dr Raina Zarb Adami discusses the anatomy of beauty, causes of ageing, and how she helps her patients look younger.

When discussing facial contouring, revolumisation immediately springs to mind or, "liquid facelift" is often mentioned. I find this term a little restrictive because, while youth is a significant player in appearance and beauty, many other contributors exist.

Symmetry is commonly recognised as one. When the left side of the face mirrors the right, this tends to be perceived as more beautiful. We find this in most classical beauties. However, we know that many people who are considered beautiful are not symmetrical at all.

Proportion has been defined in many ways. We have heard about the face being divided into vertical fifths, where one-fifth is ideally the width of an eye, and in the ideal face, these are all equal. Horizontal lines divide the ideal face is divided into equal thirds. These thirds lie between the hairline and the glabella, the glabella and the subnasale, and the subnasale and the menton.

Nature has demonstrated beauty in the golden ratio of 1:1.618. For example, the width of the base of the nose to the width of the mouth, the width of the face to the length of the face, and the thickness of the upper lip to the thickness of the lower lip. In the ideal face, these all follow this ratio, and this is seen even in the length of the bones of the hand.

The ratio of the length of the distal phalanx to the middle phalanx follows phi, and so on up to the metacarpals. We see it in seashells and in many other things in nature, and in architecture. An American surgeon, Marquardt, put these lines into a facial mask. The classical beauties of today and in days gone by all fit this mask.

The lines of the face are also notable. Our eyes fall naturally onto smooth lines, and so a smooth jaw line is considered more attractive than one made irregular by the presence of jowls. If you look at a patient's profile, a straight line between the glabella, the subnasale, and the menton is considered attractive as well. Of course, the texture and condition of the skin are important, too.

Most of these factors apply to men and women and women alike, but some key properties differ, especially in youth. In a man, it is considered more acceptable to look older. The "silver fox" is still considered attractive. In a woman, large eyes, high cheekbones with a corresponding narrow jaw with a curvaceous sigmoid Ogee curve, a smooth jawline, and a baby face are considered contributors to beauty.

In women, there is some beauty to be found in certain imperfections, such as Cindy Crawford's mole. That was her major selling point. Fuller lips come across to people as being a warmer person, therefore more approachable and, in turn, more attractive.

Angelina Jolie has a beautiful Ogee curve and rather full lips. What she has, which is not considered feminine, but nobody would say she's unattractive, is her prominent jawline. Marilyn Monroe, as well, has a rather long face with a beauty spot, and Kate Moss has the typical baby face. She has a high forehead with large eyes, prominent cheekbones and thick lips.

Narrower facial shape

Men, on the other hand, tend to have a narrower facial shape with fuller and more symmetrical lips, the upper half of the face being broader in relation to the lower, with higher cheekbones and a prominent lower jaw. A prominent chin in a man is considered more masculine, and a full head of hair, if a man has a full head of hair, is considered to be more attractive.

This is, of course, completely subjective. There are no rights or wrongs, but for us, as the medical practitioners, we have a few rules to go by to help a guide a patient to achieve an improvement in facial appearance.

Some of the men considered attractive include George Clooney, who claims he has not had any interventions. We know he does have a few wrinkles, and there was speculation he might play Simon Cowell in a film. Apparently Simon Cowell said: "If he's going to play me, he needs loads of Botox."

When we speak to and see people, we rarely just see them front on; we have to appreciate them from the oblique and lateral view. The oblique view is often the most important and is the biggest giveaway of a person's age. This is because of the curve formed by the zygomatic prominence.

The Ogee curve is the curve seen on an oblique photo formed by the lateral margin of the superior orbital rim, the eye socket, the malar prominence, and the rest of the cheek. The curvier this is, the more attractive this is considered. The inferior part of the curve tends to be more of a straight line. As we grow older, this curve tends to flatten.

What detracts from beauty, or why do we become less attractive as we grow older? Major components are muscular hyperactivity and volume loss. Up to the age of 25, our dermis has produced all the hyaluronic acid, collagen, and elastin it will ever produce. After that, we are just drawing from a bank. As we grow older, the dermis thins out and facial volume diminishes. We also use our elevator and the depressor muscles more—dynamic lines morph into static rhytids.

One of the biggest telling factors is the malar fat pad. When we were medical students, we never gave much importance to this adipose tissue. As the years take their toll and we study the science of aesthetics, we find that it is the root of most of our patients' grief.

The malar fat pad has two components: a superficial and a deep component. The deep component is fixed and doesn't migrate with age. However, the superficial component descends with age.

As the malar fat pad descends, the naso-jugal fold (commonly known as the tear trough) makes it debut. This leads to the formation of naso-labial folds taking with them the oral commissures, thus leading to down-turning corners of the mouth. In younger people, oral commissures curve upwards slightly, slowly descending with time. This leads to the formation of shadows called the marionette lines, and eventually jowls.

This is, of course, a gradual process, but it is all related to the descent of the malar fat pad. This process can be accelerated by smoking and by sudden weight loss. Very often we see skeletonisation in people who have lost weight suddenly due to diet, exercise or both.

Often, the bodies of runners and people who have dieted look brilliant, but their face gives their age away because they have a sudden, gaunt appearance. This is the same with people taking anti-retroviral medication. This is the reason cheek fillers became so popular, when people on these medications were stigmatised because they were losing this fat due to lipodystrophy. Suddenly, they could be identified as HIV-positive patients.

When it comes to marking the cheeks for rejuvenation or augmentation, we must remember the appearance of a cheek depends on many things—not just the malar fat pad. There is the underlying bony structure, the parotid gland, the musculature, especially the muscle mass of the masseter, and the overlying skin. However, there is little we can do to many of these anatomical components, but we can restore volume, or introduce it where it is needed to augment appearance, such as those with relatively narrow faces, perhaps due to elongation of the maxilla.

It is imperative to warn patients of the possibility of bruising. We avoid bruising the patient by keeping in mind the patient's anatomy. The most important structures to consider are the facial artery, which is the fourth branch of the external carotid artery coming up superficially and anterior to the masseter. This artery takes a tortuous path, so it's not always easy to predict its exact location.

In rather thin patients, the pulsation is palpable. It takes a path towards the angle of the mouth, giving off the inferior labial and superior labial arteries, coursing up towards the corner of the nose, and ending up as the angular artery next to the medial canthus of the eye. The veins follow a more direct course and are more lateral.

Inadvertent intra-arterial injection may result in embolism and block off the end artery, causing necrosis to the structures supplied by that artery. Aspiration before injection is wise.

There are various ways to mark the patient. I tend to start with the inferior orbital rim, as a superior margin. Injecting above it, is likely to cause a Tyndall effect and give the patient prominent bulges under the eyes.

After marking the orbital rim, the next structure to consider is the infraorbital nerve. In many people, you can just palpate along the inferior orbital rim and feel the notch. In patients where you can't feel that, just tap along and ask them when an altered sensation is felt. It usually resembles a tingling sensation radiating to the upper molars. Identify it and mark it. You don't want to prang that nerve or inject product next to, or worse still, into it, because it will cause the patient a sharp pain that might persist.

Hinderer's line is a line drawn from the lateral canthus to the oral commissure. We aim to avoid injecting medial to that line. The next line you draw is Frankfort's horizontal line, a horizontal line from the superior aspect of the tragus of the ear going through the inferior orbital rim. Generally, in most people, it ends up just above the nasal ala. We don't want to inject above this line because, when a patient opens her eyes, she wants to see what's in front of her. She doesn't want to see cheeks.

Case studies

Typical patients I have treated include Amanda, a 43-year-old mother of four, who I injected with Juvéderm Voluma with lidocaine into the malar area and just underneath. I used a bolus technique onto the cheekbone with a little fanning underneath. She was not too far gone, and all she needed was 1mm on each side, which has caused a big improvement in the nasojugal area, nasolabial folds and in the marionette lines. A hint of a jowl remained, but I didn't think she needed any further intervention.

Another patient, Mark, turned 50 recently, and decided to lose much weight. He did so successfully, but at the expense of looking rather gaunt. He told me that people were asking him whether he was ill instead of telling him he looked fabulous and healthy, because he had the body he always wanted. I injected Mark with 2mm on both sides of the cheeks with Juvéderm Voluma, but I put a little Juvéderm 4 into the nasolabial folds and some toxin as well.

I first treated the cheek volume and then observed the rest of the face. When treating the cheek area, which is often the cause of problems further down the face, you often see an improvement in the lower face. If needs be, I add other products afterwards. I've always found that, when I'm treating the face with dermal fillers, I start from the top and tackle the problem first.

Another patient, Sarah, was an ideal candidate for a surgical facelift and not so much for nonsurgical intervention, but she has sworn against surgery. However, if there is more than an inch to grab between your thumb and index finger in the jowl area, you cannot perform miracles with dermal fillers alone, and it's very important that patients do understand this.

Nevertheless, she was pleased with her treatment. She said she wanted only subtle results, and she got more than that, but she was pleased. I used Voluma in the cheeks and jowl area and Juvéderm 4 in the nasolabial folds.

Dr Raina Zarb Adami is a cosmetic doctor and the medical director of Aesthetic Virtue, with clinics in Harley Street, Knightsbridge and Malta. She is also the director of the Academy of Aesthetic Excellence, which provides courses in aesthetic medicine for medical professionals.

Read More (PDF)

Read More (Body Language UK)

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July 2011
PINK Magazine, Malta

THE FACE FREEZE

Dr Raina Zarb Adami is Health and Beauty Correspondent for PINK Magazine, Malta. She explains how to achieve the natural look with Botox and fillers.

Read More

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June 2011
PINK Magazine, Malta

THE LIQUID JOB

Dr Raina Zarb Adami is Health and Beauty Correspondent for PINK Magazine, Malta. Hear what she has to say about the revolutionary non-surgical nose job.

Read More

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May 2011
PINK Magazine, Malta

HANDS UP, BABY!

Dr Raina Zarb Adami is Health and Beauty Correspondent for PINK Magazine, Malta. Hear what she has to say about treatment for ageing hands.

Read More

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April 2011

STYLIST MAGAZINE

Dr Raina Zarb Adami features on page 17, issue 72 of Stylist Magazine.

www.issue.stylist.co.uk

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November 2010
SURGEON HONOURED AT LONDON AWARDS CEREMONY

Winners of the Women of the Future Awards announced

A surgical research fellow from RAFT was among nine young women honoured at the Women of the Future Awards in London last night (9 November).

Dr Raina Zarb Adami is a surgeon who graduated from Malta and trained in Australia and the UK. Today, Raina successfully combines a research fellowship in studying skin reconstruction of severe burns with a thriving private practice. As well as doing voluntary work with burn victims in Nepal, she has also recently launched the Academy of Aesthetic Excellence and is working on her first novel.

Dr Raina Zarb Adami - Winner 2010

The awards - held in association with Shell and hosted by Real Business – champion young women aged 35 and under who are making an impact in their chosen field, and have for the last five years celebrated the rising stars of business, the arts, science, technology and the media.

Other winners honoured at the awards - which were attended by the Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg, his wife Miriam Gonzalez-Durantez, and awards patron Cherie Blair– include entrepreneur Thea Green who at 24 years-old founded cosmetics group Nails Inc. Ten years later, the business has a turnover of £10million and employs more than 450 people nationwide.

Successful playwright Bola Agbaje, best known for her award winning play ‘Gone Too Far’, Gemma Tuley, who left Gordan Ramsey’s Claridge’s to become the head chef at top London restaurant Manson, and 16 year-old London schoolgirl Tabitha Manzuangani also received accolades.

The full list of winners is (*please see full winners’ biographies in the Notes to Editors)

The Arts & Culture Award: Playwright Bola Agbaje, ‘Gone Too Far’ and chef Gemma Tuley, Manson Restaurant

Business Woman of the Future: Lucinda Garrett, nuclear planning and performance manager at Centrica.

Entrepreneurial Woman of the Future: Thea Green, founder of cosmetics group Nails Inc.

Media Woman of the Future: Lisa Smosarski, editor of the first free weekly magazine, Stylist.

The Professions Woman of the Future: Dr Raina Zarb Adami, surgical research fellow at The Restoration of Appearance and Function Trust (RAFT).

Science and Technology Woman of the Future: Head of communications for Cisco UK and Ireland, Rina Madlani.

The MBA Star Award: Former Goldman Sachs analyst and Saïd Business School student, Carolina Gonzalez-Bunster.

The Young Star Award: 16-year old Norwood School student Tabitha Manzuangani.

Mentor of the Year: Phil Smith, CEO of Cisco UK and Ireland.

The Woman of the Future Corporate Award: The Olympic Delivery Authority

The Deputy Prime Minister, Rt Hon Nick Clegg MP, said: “I am delighted to have the opportunity to pay tribute to the enormous contribution women make to our society, not least to our economy. It is absolutely right that we recognise these individuals for their talent and their phenomenal achievements. Their stories are an inspiration to young women – and young men – everywhere.”

Awards founder and chairman Pinky Lilani OBE said: “Each of this year’s winners remained determined and ambitious in spite of potential obstacles which is a testament to the nature of the young women in our country and rewarding their achievements is crucial in motivating other women of Britain’s future.

“This year we launched a new category, the MBA Star Award, which uncovered a group of women who are studying for the qualification but have already demonstrated outstanding potential. Carolina is the first of many such women that will be recognised through the awards.”

Paul Milliken, VP, Human Resources, UK, Ireland & Nordics, at Shell, said: “Each year Shell witnesses a staggering number of inspirational young women commended for their achievements and this year’s winners have really encapsulated the spirit of the awards.

“Through our backing of the awards, we’re keen to demonstrate our long-term commitment to motivated young British women and those that are capable of managing the challenge Britain faces in delivering renewable energy and creating a sustainable supply to meet increasing demand.”

The ceremony, which was compered by BBC newsreader Riz Lateef, was attended by Cherie Blair, Oscar award winning screenwriter Julian Fellowes, and presenter Dawn Porter.

The Women of the Future Awards were hosted by Real Business magazine in association with Shell at the London Marriott, Grosvenor Square.

For information on the awards visit: http://wof.realbusiness.co.uk/

Press Information
For further information and photography, please contact:
Fiona Mackie
Citypress
T 0161 235 0332
E fiona.mackie@citypress.co.uk

Martin Currie
Citypress
T 0161 235 0310
E martin.currie@citypress.co.uk

Notes to Editors:
1. Winners biographies:

The Arts & Culture Award – Joint winners: Bola Agbaje, Playwright ‘Gone Too Far’ and Gemma Tuley, Chef, Manson Restaurant
Bola - Bola Agbaje came through the Royal Court’s Critical Mass programme. Her debut play Gone Too Far! premiered at the Royal Court in 2007, and won an Olivier Award for Outstanding Achievement and a Most Promising Playwright nomination at the Evening Standard Awards 2008. Her other plays include If Things Were Different, In Time and Anything You Can Do, for Soho Theatre. She is currently under commission for the Royal Court Theatre and is a tutor for the young writers’ programme at the Lyric Hammersmith theatre.

Gemma - After leaving school at 16, Gemma worked her way up through a series of chef jobs near her home in Kent before landing a junior position in Gordon Ramsay's kitchen at Claridge's at 18. Her mentor instantly saw her potential: "Gemma had a single-mindedness that was almost unnerving. She held her own in that kitchen as a chef de partie." Her training included an 18-month stint in the kitchen of Guy Savoy, the legendary Parisian chef. Gemma is now the head chef at Manson, a new restaurant, brasserie and grill in London's Fulham.

Business Woman of the Future – Lucinda Garrett, nuclear planning and performance manager, Centrica
Following a mechanical engineering degree at Newcastle University, Lucinda did a one-year stint with British Gas before joining energy giant Centrica as a project engineer. During her seven years with the company, her roles have included co-ordinating contractor work, acquisition integration and process improvements. Lucinda is currently responsible for Centrica’s new nuclear projects, briefing stakeholders and keeping abreast of all government and regulatory risks.

Entrepreneurial Woman of the Future – Thea Green, founder, Nails Inc.
Former Tatler editor Thea was inspired to launch a chain of nail bars during her frequent visits to New York. She opened her first Nails Inc bars, offering speedy 15-minute manicures, in 2000. The following year, she introduced the three-week manicure, a revolutionary concept using organic gel. In 2003, Nails Inc set up its own training academy for beauty therapists in London and, two years later, the luxury "champagne nail bar" was born. Thea has gone on to open sister brand Get Lashed and create new products including crystal cap polishes and Swarovski crystal pedicures.

Media Woman of the Future – Lisa Smosarski, editor, Stylist
Lisa is the launch editor of Stylist, the first ‘freemium’ weekly women’s title and the fourth biggest women’s magazine by distribution. She previously worked as an editor at More, Smash Hits and Bliss, where she scooped a BSME editor of the year award. She also presented a TV series for Channel 4 called Make Me A Grown Up.

The Professions Woman of the Future - Dr Raina Zarb Adami, surgical research fellow, RAFT
Dr Raina Zarb Adami is a surgeon who graduated from Malta and trained in Australia and the UK. Today, Raina successfully combines a research fellowship in studying skin reconstruction of severe burns with a thriving private practice. As well as doing voluntary work with burn victims in Nepal, she has also recently launched the Academy of Aesthetic Excellence and is working on her first novel.

Science and Technology Woman of the Future – Rina Madlani, head of communications, Cisco UK and Ireland
Born in India, and a graduate of business studies from the University of Hertfordshire, Rina Madlani is an accomplished IT and diversity advocate who is passionate about public sector innovation. Her initiative Charity Chums reflects her dedication to supporting young enterprise within the local community.

The MBA Star Award – Carolina Gonzalez-Bunster, founder, The Walkabout Foundation (Saïd Business School, Oxford)
For this former Goldman Sachs analyst, a trip to the YMCA swimming pool in Greenwich, Connecticut, US, sparked the desire to set up a charity: "There was no outdoor ramp to accommodate the wheelchair belonging to my brother, who is paralyzed from the chest down. Instead of joining another organisation, I decided to do something that would raise funds to find a cure for spinal cord injuries.” Carolina set up The Walkabout Foundation and, last summer, walked 500 miles over four weeks on the mountainous path from Biarritz to Santiago de Compostela – raising more than $160,000.

The Young Star Award – Tabitha Manzuangani, student, Norwood School
Tabitha arrived in London from the Democratic Republic of Congo in 2006 and has shone as a scholar, completing the University of Cambridge’s Fast Forward maths Programme and impressing the team at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine during her work-experience there. For the past 18 months, she has been volunteering for the Klevis Kola Foundation, helping children from refugee and asylum-seeking backgrounds with English and school work.

Mentor of the Year – Phil Smith, CEO, Cisco UK and Ireland
Responsible for the largest Cisco operation outside of North America, Phil Smith is also an advocate of networking technologies to the region's business and political leaders. Keen to encourage the next generation, Phil is a regular speaker on the future of the internet and a regular panelist for the Sunday Times Enterprise Network feature, he also sits on the board of Young Enterprise and e-Skills UK.

The Woman of the Future Corporate Award – The Olympic Delivery Authority
The ODA is using the power of the Olympic Games to inspire change in the construction industry. By challenging stereotypes, the ODA has raised construction industry standards in promoting women in the workplace, helping to establish an environment where women in construction can flourish.

2. The judging panel included:
Chair of the judging panel, Her Royal Highness Princess Badiya Bint El Hassan
- Shima Barakat, research and teaching fellow, Centre for Entrepreneurial Learning, Campbridge Judge Business School
- Guy Black, executive director, Telegraph Media Group
- Mick Buckley, president and CEO, EMEA, CNBC
- Aidan Connolly, chief executive, Sodexo UK and Ireland
- Sarah Deaves, managing director, affluent banking, The Royal Bank of Scotland Group
- Nicky Dulieu, chief executive, Hobbs
- Lucy George, publicity manager, Chic Outlet Shopping Villages, Value Retail
- Kathryn Gramling, principal, Booz & Company
- Trish Halpin, editor, Marie Claire
- David Harrison, vice president, Visa Commercial, Visa Europe
- Ben Hughes, global commercial director and deputy CEO, The Financial Times
- Emma Kitchener Fellowes, lady in waiting to HRH Princess Michael of Kent
- Sally Martin, consultancy manager and chair Shell Women’s Network UK, Shell
- Ruby McGregor-Smith, CEO, MITIE Group
- Judith McKenna, chief financial officer, Asda
- Birgit Neu, COO, corporate development, HSBC
- Richard Reid, London chairman, KPMG LLP
- Jean Sharp, chief taxation officer, Aviva
- Bob Stefanowski, chairman and managing partner, North America and Asia, 3i Corporation
- Carla Stent, chief administrative officer and deputy CEO, Virgin Management
- Sue Vinnicombe OBE, professor of organizational behavior and diversity management, Cranfield School of Management
- Bernadette Wightman, director channels and SMB, Cisco Systems
- Vanessa Wright, communications director, Chivas Brothers Ltd

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November 2010
http://realbusiness.co.uk/business_woman/women_of_the_future_awards_2010_the_winners

WOMEN OF THE FUTURE AWARDS 2010: THE WINNERS

Royalty, politicians and leading business people gathered in London last night to celebrate the Women of the Future Awards.
The Women of the Future Awards 2010, in association with Shell, brought together over 500 people at the London Marriott Grosvenor Square last night.

Among the long list of VIPs, we spotted Her Highness Princess Badiya bint El Hassan, deputy prime minister Nick Clegg, awards patron Cherie Blair, BBC London News's Riz Lateef, TV presenter Dawn Porter, Olympic gold medallist Jonathan Edwards, Downton Abbey creator Julian Fellowes and many more.

Winners 2010

"I'm proud to be here again," said patron Cherie Blair. "These awards get bigger and better every year." Presenting the award for the Professions Woman of the Future, she quipped: "I was a Woman of the Future in this category once upon a time! When I entered the legal profession in 1976, just ten per cent of entrants to the bar were women."

Clegg (who, usually, was joined on stage by his wife Miriam González Durántez) told the audience he'd attended three awards ceremonies in 24 hours and was disgruntled by the fact that "I haven't been nominated for any awards so far". He added: "The world of politics is still so dominated by men – it's liberating to spend time with you all. You are all role models in your own right."

Indeed, all were there for one reason: to celebrate Britain and the world's future female leaders. The sheer diversity and variety of talent among the shortlist was phenomenal: as Pinky Lilani, the awards' creator, said, “Where else in Britain – or indeed the world – would you meet circus producers, hedge fund managers and inventors all in one room, on one night? This really is a kaleidoscopic programme.”

Looking at the winners, and indeed the shortlisted candidates too, the future looks very bright, led by strong women.
Here is the full list of winners:

Professions Woman of the Future (supported by Sodexo)
Dr Raina Zarb Adami, surgical research fellow at The Restoration of Appearance and Function Trust (RAFT)

Raina is a surgeon who graduated from Malta and trained in Australia and the UK. Today, Raina successfully combines a research fellowship in studying skin reconstruction of severe burns with a thriving private practice. As well as doing voluntary work with burn victims in Nepal, Raina has recently launched the Academy of Aesthetic Excellence.

Entrepreneurial Woman of the Future (supported by Visa Europe)
Thea Green, MD of Nails Inc

Former Tatler editor Thea was inspired to launch a chain of nail bars during her frequent visits to New York. She opened her first Nails Inc bars, offering speedy 15-minute manicures, in 2000. The following year, she introduced the three-week manicure, a revolutionary concept using organic gel. In 2003, Nails Inc set up its own training academy for beauty therapists in London and, two years later, the luxury “champagne nail bar” was born. Thea has gone on to open sister brand Get Lashed and create new products including crystal cap polishes and Swarovski crystal procedures. Picking up the award last night, she thanked the 450 (mainly female) employees at Nails Inc: "They're my women of the future".

Science and Technology Woman of the Future (supported by Shell)
Rina Madlani, head of communications, Cisco UK & Ireland

Born in India, and a graduate of business studies from the University of Hertfordshire, Rina is an accomplished IT and diversity advocate who is passionate about public sector innovation. Her initiative, Charity Chums, reflects her dedication to supporting young enterprise within the local community.

Business Woman of the Future (supported by ASDA)
Lucinda Garrett, nuclear planning and performance manager, Centrica

Following a mechanical engineering degree at Newcastle University, Lucinda did a one-year stint with British Gas before joining energy giant Centrica as a project engineer. During her seven years with the company, her roles have included co-ordinating contractor work, acquisition integration and process improvements. Lucinda is currently responsible for Centrica's new nuclear projects, briefing stakeholders and keeping abreast of all government and regulatory risks.

The MBA Star Award (supported by KPMG)
Carolina Gonzales-Bunster, The Walkabout Foundation (Said Business School, Oxford)

For this former Goldman Sachs analyst, a trip to a YMCA swimming pool in the US sparked the desire to set up a charity: “There was no outdoor ramp to accommodate the wheelchair belonging to my brother, who is paralysed from the chest down. I decided to do something that would raise funds to find a cure for spinal cord injuries.” Carolina set up The Walkabout Foundation and, last summer, walked 500 miles over four weeks on the mountainous path from Biarritz to Santiago de Compostela – raising more than $160,000.

Media Woman of the Future
Lisa Smosarski, editor, Stylist

Lisa is the launch editor of Stylist, the first freemium weekly women's title and the fourth biggest women's magazine by distribution. She previously worked as an editor at More, Smash Hits and Bliss, where she scooped a BSME Editor of the Year award. She also presented a TV series for Channel 4 called Make Me A Grown Up.

Arts and Culture Woman of the Future (supported by Hobbs)
Bola Agbaje, playwright

Bola came through the Royal Court's Critical Mass programme. Her debut play Gone Too Far! premiered at the Royal Court in 2007, and won an Olivier Award for Oustanding Achievement and a Most Promising Playwright nomination at the Evening Standard Awards 2008. Her other plays include If Things Were Different, In Time and Anything You Can Do, Everything Must Go for Soho Theatre. She is currently under commission for the Royal Court Theatre and is a tutor for the young writers' programme at the Lyric Hammersmith theatre. "I feel like Cinderella," she said last night. "I still have a day job and I had to beg my manager to give me time off to attend this event." She added: "Writing a play is hard work – especially now the UK Film Council has been scrapped." (It's a shame Clegg wasn't around at the point to hear the dig!)
Gemma Tuley, head chef, Manson Restaurant

After leaving school at 16, Gemma worked her way up through a series of chef jobs near her home in Kent before landing a junior position in Gordon Ramsay's kitchen at Claridge's at 18. Her mentor instantly saw her potential: “Gemma had a single-mindedness that was almost unnerving. She held her own in that kitchen as a chef de partie.” Her training included an 18-month stint in the kitchen of Guy Savoy, the legendary Parisian chef. Gemma is now the head chef at Manson, a new restaurant, brasserie and grill in London's Fulham.

The Young Star Award (supported by Barclays)
Tabitha Manzuangani, student, Norwood School

Tabitha arrived in London from the Democratic Republic of Congo in 2006 and has shone as a scholar, completing the University of Cambridge's Fast Forward Maths Programme and impressing the team at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine during her work experience there. For the past 18 months, she has been volunteering for the Klevis Kola Foundation, helping children from refugee and asylum-seeking backgrounds with English and school work.

Mentor of the Year (supported by Booz & Company)
Phil Smith, CEO, Cisco UK & Ireland

Responsible for the largest Cisco operation outside of North America, Phil is also an advocate of networking technologies to the region's business and political leaders. Keen to encourage the next generation, Phil is a regular speaker on the future of the internet and a regular panelist for the Sunday Times Enterprise Network and also sits on the board of Young Enterprise and e-Skills UK.

The Women of the Future Corporate Award (supported by AVIVA)
The Olympic Delivery Authority

The Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) is using the power of the Olympic Games to inspire change in the construction industry. By challenging stereotypes, the ODA has raised construction industry standards in promoting women in the workplace, helping to establish an environment where women in construction can flourish. As she collected the award, Alison Nimmo, director of regeneration of the ODA, said: "I know it's unfashionable to say this but this project is on time and on budget!"

By Jason Hesse

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November 2010
Aesthetic Dentistry Today

WHY AESTHETIC MEDICINE IS SURVIVING

"In the face of recession, aesthetic procedures are still going strong and demand is rising. Dr Raina Zarb Adami speaks from her experience of working in the world of aesthetic medicine and surgery..."

Read More

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October 2010
LEADING FEMALE MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL IN THE RUNNING FOR NATIONAL AWARD

Shortlist announced for the Women of the Future Awards 2010
Dr Raina Zarb Adami, RAFT (The Restoration of Appearance and Function Trust) will battle it out to be crowned a Woman of the Future at a high-profile ceremony in London this November.

Founded and chaired by Pinky Lilani OBE, organised by Caspian Publishing and held in association with Shell, the awards celebrate the rising stars of business, the arts, science, technology and media, honouring women aged 35 and under who are making an impact in their chosen fields. The Women of the Future Awards are supported by Real Business magazine.
Dr Raina Zarb Adami has been shortlisted for The Professions Woman of the Future award. A judging panel led by HRH Princess Badiya bint El Hassan will meet Dr Raina Zarb Adami and other finalists on October 8 in London. Winners will be announced at a glittering ceremony on 9 November.

This year a new category is introduced, recognising the most talented female MBA students - The MBA Star award.
Since their creation in 2006, the Women of the Future Awards – whose patrons are Her Highness Princess Zahra Aga Khan and Cherie Blair - have unearthed glittering young talent such as online retail supremo Holly Tucker of notonthehighstreet.com, and the stars of West End musical Wicked – Dianne Pilkington and Alexia Khadime.

High flyers from the corporate world are also vying for an award, including the most promising female talent from the likes of HSBC, BT and Asda.

The awards ceremony takes place at the London Marriott Hotel Grosvenor Square on Tuesday November 9, 2010.

Last year’s magnificent event was attended by David Cameron, Her Royal Highness Princess Badiya bint El Hassan, novelist Salman Rushdie, and actress Anna Chancellor.

Pinky Lilani said: “Young women are achieving more now than ever before. The Women of the Future Awards champion these women and give them a platform from which they can go even further.”

“This year we’ve got an exceptional shortlist of candidates for each of the ten awards, including our new MBA Star category, which identifies women who have demonstrated exceptional promise and vision throughout their studies to be the trailblazers of tomorrow.”

Paul Milliken, VP, Human Resources, UK, Ireland & Nordics, at Shell, the awards’ long-standing sponsor, said: “This year’s shortlist exemplifies the talent that young women can offer to UK industries. Each of the shortlisted nominees has already achieved something significant and it is vital that we recognise their ability and encourage them to strive even further.

“The awards prove to the next generation of young women that they can achieve their goals and should not be deterred because of age or gender. Shell is proud to be the longest standing sponsor of a ceremony which champions our future innovators and entrepreneurs.”

Matthew Rock, co-founder of Caspian Publishing and editor-in-chief of Real Business, said: “The Women of the Future shortlists are a glimpse into a bright future for business. Enterprise is everywhere – in large businesses and small, right across British life. Unleash this talent, and Britain’s future is truly exciting.”
For information on the awards, visit: http://wof.realbusiness.co.uk/

Press information
For more information please contact:

Fiona Mackie
Citypress
T. 0161 235 0332
E. fiona.mackie@citypress.co.uk

Martin Currie
Citypress
T. 0161 235 0332
E. martin.currie@citypress.co.uk

Notes to Editors:
The Women of the Future Awards are hosted by Caspian Publishing and Real Business magazine, in association with Shell.
The Women of the Future Awards are also supported by: Aviva, Asda, Barclays, Visa, Sodexo, Hobbs, Booz & Company, KPMG. Media partners are: Financial Times & CNBC. Educational partner is: Cambridge Judge Business School.

1. The full list of shortlisted nominees is as follows:
Arts and Culture Woman of the Future

Bola Agbaje, playwright of Gone Too Far
Gemma Boaler and Faye Hunter, Underdogs Management
Kishani Jayasinghe, Soprano
Leila Jones, Roundhouse
Gemma Tuley, Manson Restaurant
Samantha Ward, Pianist

Business Woman of the Future
Maggie Berry, womenintechnology.co.uk
Eleanor Blagbrough, ECI Partners
Lucinda Garrett, Centrica
Emma Harris, Asda
Katie Milligan, BT
Carol Paterson Smith, Rothschild Blackpoint

Entrepreneurial Woman of the Future
Anna Bance, Girls Meet Dress
Kirsty Goodger, Elemental Herbology
Thea Green, Nails Inc.
Janan Leo, Cocorose, London
Victoria Wills, NuBeginnings

Media Woman of the Future
Catherine Bray, Film4.com
Jessica Huie, JHPR
Lisa Smosarski, Stylist
Sonal Thakrar, Cisco
Lucy Tobin, Evening Standard

The Professions Woman of the Future
Dr Ogo Eze, Dentist@W2
Misha Patel, Clifford Chance LLP
Francesca Pierce, BSkyB
Karen Ward, HSBC
Dr Raina Zarb Adami, RAFT

Science and Technology Woman of the Future
Cathy Bishop, BDP
Maria Chiara Laganà, RWE npower
Danielle George, University of Manchester
Lynne MacKenzie Fraser, Centrica
Rina Madlani, Cisco UK & Ireland

The MBA Star Award
Asma Ahmed, University of Bath
Kathryn Farmer, London Business School
Carolina Gonzalez-Bunster, The Walkabout Foundation (Said Business School, Oxford)
Jo Kelly, Renewable World (Cranfield School of Management)
Stephanie Leung, Genie Solutions (Cambridge Judge Business School)
Kanini Mutooni, Myazimia.org (Cass Business School, London)

The Young Star Award
Suraiya Chowdhury, Mulberry School
Zeenat Islam, University of Warwick
Tabitha Manzuangani, Norwood School
Emily Llewellyn, Event Rider
Carly Ward, Young Entrepreneur Society

Mentor of the Year
Mike Coupe, J Sainsbury
Valerie O’Connell, The Prince’s Trust
Lynne Owens, Metropolitan Police
Phil Smith, Cisco UK & Ireland
Chris Southam, Chillout UK

The Woman of the Future Corporate Award
Bank of New York Mellon
ICAEW
The Olympic Delivery Authority
Santander

2. The judging panel includes:
Chair of the judging panel, Her Royal Highness Princess Badiya bint El Hassan
- Shima Barakat, research and teaching fellow, Centre for Entrepreneurial Learning, Cambridge
- Guy Black, executive director, Telegraph Media Group
- Mick Buckley, president and CEO, EMEA, CNBC
- Aidan Connolly, chief executive, Sodexo UK and Ireland
- Sarah Deaves, managing director, affluent banking, The Royal Bank of Scotland Group
- Nicky Dulieu, chief executive, Hobbs
- Emma Kitchener Fellowes
- Lucy George, publicity manager, Chic Outlet Shopping Villages, Value Retail
- Kathryn Gramling, principal, Booz & Company
- Trish Halpin, editor, Marie Claire
- David Harrison, vice president, Visa Commercial, Visa Europe
- Ben Hughes, global commercial director and deputy CEO, The Financial Times
- Sally Martin, consultancy manager and chair Shell Women’s Network UK, Shell
- Ruby McGregor-Smith, CEO, MITIE Group
- Judith McKenna, chief financial officer, Asda
- Birgit Neu, COO, corporate development, HSBC
- Richard Reid, London chairman, KPMG LLP
- Jean Sharp, chief taxation officer, Aviva
- Carla Stent, chief administrative officer and deputy CEO, Virgin Management
- Bob Stefanowski, chairman and managing partner, North America and Asia, 3i Corporation
- Sue Vinnicombe OBE, professor of organizational behavior and diversity management, Cranfield School of Management
- Bernadette Wightman, director channels and SMB, Cisco Systems
- Vanessa Wright, communications director, Chivas Brothers Ltd

3. The full list of categories is as follows:
- Business Women of the Future
- The Professions Women of the Future
- The Arts and Culture Woman of the Future
- Media Woman of the Future
- Entrepreneurial Woman of the Future
- Science and Technology Woman of the Future (Sponsored by Shell)
- The MBA Star Award
- The Young Star Award
- Mentor of the Year – open to men and women with no age limit
- The Women of the Future Corporate Award

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October 2010
Marie Claire Magazine

NEW SKIN IN 4 DAYS

Today it’s possible to replace skin that has been burned or wounded with skin grafts from other parts of the body or skin tissue engineered in a lab. “But it usually takes at least two weeks, leaves scars and the results often have the snake-like texture of burned or grafted skin” says Dr Raina Zarb Adami, surgical research fellow at The Restoration of Appearance and Function Trust (RAFT), Britain’s skin-saving charity.

But RAFT research has now engineered artificial skin that can begin to re-grow the middle layer of skin - the dermis - within only four days. “Known as Smart Matrix, this synthetic skin is engineered from human blood and is extremely safe,” says Dr Zarb Adami.  It gives a cosmetically superior result to any product available now, looks more like real skin and begins to develop in days. Like a skin scaffold, Smart Matrix stimulates the growth of capillaries so the skin replaces itself with less scarring and a more realistic appearance than ever before. “Smart Matrix should be available on the NHS within three years” says Dr Zarb Adami.  “It’s being developed so burns and wounds victims get better treatment but its cosmetic possibilities are exciting” she admits. “It replaces the skin’s dermis, which is where aging causes loss of collagen and elastin.  I have no doubt it will be used to treat aging skin in future.”

What could mean for me in 2030? 
“We will have a dermal replacement which acts as a substitute for younger skin and allows it to quickly rebuild itself,” says Dr Zarb Adami. “Synthetic skin may be more readily available to surgeons, probably in sterile sachets or sprays kept in the surgery, ready to apply straight to aging, burned or scarred skin.”

Anna Magee
Journalist

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May 2010
The Times Online

LIPOSUCTION AND LASERING IS ALL IN A DAY’S WORK FOR KNIGHTSBRIDGE CLINIC

Impossibly beautiful doctors deliver everything from earlobe reconstruction to tattoo removal and G-Spot enhancement

The Knightsbridge Laser Clinic is an odd little place. It specialises in non-surgical cosmetic procedures — shooting fillers into your lips, breasts, forehead or frown lines, or sucking fat from pretty much everywhere else. In the waiting room there are no herbal teas or espressos, and the reading material is Hello! and Heat, not Harper’s or Vogue.

The glamour comes from the doctors: three out of four are women, impossibly beautiful, unlined, pencil-slim, but curved where it counts. Salinda Johnson, a sensationally attractive doctor specialising in Botox and fillers, receives flowers within an hour of arriving, sent by an anonymous admirer. Watching these women shepherding clients and yielding syringes is like viewing an American miniseries; exciting, glamorous, but completely unrealistic. No doctor could ever look like this (unless she had an unlimited supply of non-surgical cosmetic procedures at her disposal).

9am: G-Spot Amplification
Lara, a South African PA, is here to discuss a G-Spot enhancement with Dr Lamia Elthohamy. After five years with her one and only partner, Lara, 24, hasn’t had an orgasm through intercourse. “Have you ever had an orgasm?” asks the doctor. “No”, replies Lara. “Never?” “No,” says Lara again. “Never ever had an orgasm?” repeats the doctor. Silence. “Oh, yes,” falters Lara, confused. “I have had an orgasm.”

Good,” says Dr Elthohamy, “as this wouldn’t work on someone who has never had an orgasm” The G-Spot Amplification, “invented” by a Beverly Hills gynaecologist, takes 20 minutes and involves injecting collagen on to the G-spot under a local anaesthetic. The aim is to enhance sexual arousal. “In America, there is an 80 per cent success rate,” Dr Elthohamy tells Lara.
The treatment costs £800 and lasts about six months. Lara makes a booking; her boyfriend is paying.

9.30am: Lip enhancement
“I’ve got a very small mouth,” says Michaela, 25, a Chloë Sevigny lookalike. “I’ve had this before and loved it. I’m from South Africa and I’ve had too much sun.” Dr Johnson numbs Michaela’s lips with some cream before injecting the filler (which has built-in anaesthetic) and gently shaping it through the lips. Michaela leaves with a prominent cupid’s bow, a bloodied, swollen pout.

After four to 12 hours, the swelling should subside — and only the pout remain. The cost is £250 and the effects last from four to six months.

10am: Breast enhancement

Susan, 27, has wanted a boob job since her teens. She has decided to postpone surgery until after she has had children but hopes that Macrolane will be a temporary solution. “My friend had it. Her boobs look beautiful and she flaunts it.”

Macrolane is a filler gel, used for 25 years in lips and, since 2007, in breasts and buttocks. (In breasts, a shot can move you up one bra size.) Given under local anaesthetic, it takes 45 minutes and the results are instant. Macrolane starts at £1,900 and lasts 12 to 18 months.

Susan decides to talk to her partner about finances. “Hopefully I’ll make an appointment tomorrow.”

11am: Botox
Anthony, a brand manager, is having his first shot of Botox. “I’m 33 in a week, so it’s time,” he says. He has opted to have it around his crow’s feet (£250) as his face is pretty unlined elsewhere. “That’s because you smile more than you frown,” explains Dr Raina Zarb Adami — Maltese, stunning, and, she admits, also Botoxed.

The injections are over in minutes. “Is that really it?” Anthony asks. “Amazing! Cool!” The shots will take seven to ten days to take effect — and another four to six months to be reabsorbed.

Laser hair removal
A stream of clients flows in for hair removal. Intense Pulse Light laser hair removal destroys the hair follicle so that after three to six treatments most clients will see an 80 per cent reduction in regrowth. It’s a little hot — but faster and much less painful than waxing.

Rebecca, 40, a publisher who has never had any other cosmetic procedure (“I’m not that kind of person”), pops in to get her upper lip lasered. “I used to bleach until my friend told me about this. It’s fantastic.”

Later, Tony, 47, an entrepreneur, has his back done because, he says, “I’m not a fan of hairy backs, and nor is my wife. No one else knows, though — especially my mates. I couldn’t live it down.” A course of four laser sessions costs about £280.

1pm: Lunch-time lipo
Ali, 27, and his wife, Rose, 24, arrive for Ali’s laser lipolysis, a “liposuction lite” that breaks down and removes areas of fat without surgery or general anaesthetic. (A small incision allows a laser to liquefy the fat, which is sucked out.) This is suitable for someone with areas of flab that won’t shift. Ali is small and toned — he works out five days a week — but can’t shift fat from his middle. He and Rose are from Qatar.

Rose is studying in the UK, heard about lipolysis and set up the appointment. Ali arrived in London three days ago and will fly back in another three days, hopefully minus a litre of fat.

“I arranged everything,” Rose says. “Not because I don’t like his tummy, but because I’m sick of him standing naked in front of the mirror for half an hour, getting upset.” The procedure will take two hours, followed by an hour’s recovery. It costs £4,600. “Ali wants three children,” Rose says, “and then he promises that I can have it, too.”

2.30pm: Tattoo removal
Peter, 28, an environmental consultant, arrives to have what looks like a large squatting toad removed from his shoulder. He had the tattoo aged 15, and has hated it ever since. “It was supposed to be a bat, but people usually think it’s a pig,” he says. Removal involves a laser that emits pulses of light to break up the ink particles (it works best on dark tattoos — red and green are almost impossible to shift).

“It’s ten times more painful than having a tattoo,” warns Donna, the laser specialist, who estimates that the removal will require about six sessions, each costing £90.

The first is over in five minutes — Peter says that each pulse feels like a sharp prick combined with a static shock. It’s worth it, though. The tattoo is noticeably lighter.

3pm: Earlobe reconstruction
Emma, 22, is here with her mum to have an earlobe sewn back together — a surprisingly common practice thanks to long, heavy fashion earrings. “My right ear was pierced quite low,” she says. “Last year, I was watching TV, went to twiddle my earring and it came out in my hand — with the butterfly still on.” Her lobe had split. “We rushed to casualty, thinking they would stitch it up, but they sent me home. My GP basically told me to live with it.”

Earlobe reconstruction is hard to get on the NHS and so Dr Zarb Adami does a roaring trade, repairing about four lobes a week. (Prices start at £300.) Emma lies back, is injected with a local anaesthetic, then her lobe is stitched back together. The resulting thin scar will be barely visible.

5pm: Skin rejuvenation

“Other than this, I’m going to grow old gracefully,” says Jenny, 56, an entertainment PR, who is having IPL laser treatment on her neck and décolletage to remove redness, freckling, threading and pigmentation. “I’m very conscious that when I laugh a lot or have a few drinks, I get redder still,” she says. Three to ten days after the treatment, her thread veins should be impossible to see, and her skin, pumped with collagen, will be smooth and glowing. The cost is £350.

Knightsbridge Laser Clinic
www.knightsbridgelaserclinic.co.uk
T: 020 7052 9797

Anna Moore
The Times Online

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